Getting Sweded

I have settled into the hotel here in Stockholm after a very long journey. I left London at 8pm yesterday, landed in Amsterdam a little after 10pm, wandered the streets of Amsterdam all night, didn’t get stabbed, flew to Stockholm around 6am, and walked around like a zombie most of the day. I hopped on the train with Tim and a couple of his coworkers to the central station, where we walked around a street market and inside a shopping mall. I bought a trendy-ish scarf at one of the three H&Ms on one block (no exaggeration). I think I’d like to also buy a nicer scarf somewhere this week, too. Stockholm’s a very fashionable place, so I think I’d do well to shop a bit – but only a tiny bit. It’s Norway-expensive here.

If anyone has any recommendations for places to see and things to do, please let me know. Here are a few pictures from the trip so far (click to super-size):

Waiting at Heathrow:
On my way to Stockholm

I felt very welcome at the mall:
Stockholm mall

Balloons over Stockholm (from the hotel window):
Stockholm balloons

Stockholm balloons

Jerk it

I’ve been enjoying this song from Thunderheist for a week now. I’ve been enjoying the winning video (done by That Go [warning: sound]) even more. I have been remiss in my duties as a blogger, and I apologize. Enjoy:


thunderheist – jerk it (contest cut) from thatgo on Vimeo.

It seems like the video is filmed with the Phantom, or some other sort of super-high-speed imaging device. Check out this other video that uses it. (Thanks, Allen!)
Edit: I guess it’s actually shot on a Red.

Film fan

OK, so as it was pointed out this weekend, I’m a total photo nerd. And even though my beloved old Nikon F chewed up and spat out a roll of exposed film Saturday night, I still firmly believe in the power of film over digital. Not that I’m anti-digital, but given the choice, I’d usually shoot with an old film camera. I’m tempted to turn this into a more general argument for analog over digital, but I’ll hold back. So speaking of old cameras and film, here’s a really awesome page that  lists cameras by type and shows example images from each.

Click for original size

(Taken with my Lubitel lomo.)

The Big Picture

Holy crap. Best new blog in a while. From the Boston Globe, The Big Picture is a relatively simple idea, executed gorgeously: few words, big, pretty pictures, tells a story. It just started this month, and already there are some really great stories and even better photos:

Daily Life in Sadr City, Iraq

The Sky, From Above

Mississippi Floodwaters in Iowa

Ethiopia in Food Crisis Once More

You really have to see these full-sized. Stunning work.

Life through an SX-70 lens

This has been blogged ubiquitously today, so much so that the original site exceeded bandwidth. It should be back up soon, but until then there are still pictures around, and more background on the story here. Mental Floss says it best:

He Took a Polaroid Every Day, Until the Day He Died

Yesterday I came across a slightly mysterious website — a collection of Polaroids, one per day, from March 31, 1979 through October 25, 1997. There’s no author listed, no contact info, and no other indication as to where these came from. So, naturally, I started looking through the photos. I was stunned by what I found.

In 1979 the photos start casually, with pictures of friends, picnics, dinners, and so on.

Sadly, the story ends abruptly. But the Polaroids live on, giving their owner’s life a warm tint as only Polaroids can – a Time-Zero flipbook of a man’s daily life from 1979-1997. It’s such a powerful piece of work to me: the thousands of neatly categorized images, the inherent nostalgia of the Polaroid color palette, the mundane alongside the intimate portraits of happiness and illness, and those who lived on and honored their friend with this exhibit – the story of a life recounted by an SX-70.

Holga+Polaroid

gyj_sha.jpgIt’s pricey, but it’s cool:

 Simply a perfect couple: The breathtaking charm of the legendary Holga, encouraging you to dive into experimental photographic effects and the amazing advantages and features of the Polaroid instant Photography including the Image Transfer Technique when using the 88 or 669 Film. With this set you have all the options, deciding whether you take medium format pictures, 35mm Shots or simply load your Holga with overwhelming Polaroid material.

They also have just the back, if you have your own Holga 120.

Easy digital photos with vintage cameras

img_3903_thumb.jpgThis is such a cool, simple trick:

You’ll need two cameras for this trick: one (preferably digital) to take the picture and another to aim through. Most people seem to favor cameras with waist-level viewfinders, such as the old Kodak Duaflex, because they’re large and easy to see.Frame your shot using the older camera (call it Camera B), then aim your digital camera (Camera A) at the viewfinder and take the picture. Afterwards, crop the photo to take out everything but the viewfinder image.

The results look pretty awesome!