Making stuff

Video

This is a really interesting Kickstarter project – build your own electronics with modular components. Something like Modulo might have kept Radio Shack in business.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/modulo/modulo-a-simple-modular-solution-for-building-elec/widget/video.html

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American Migration Patters

Saw this a while back, but I forgot to post it. It’s a very cool interactive map. We’re almost trading evenly with Portland here in Austin. There it is: http://www.forbes.com/special-report/2011/migration.html

The Fragmented Orchestra

This is one of the weirdest/coolest sounding events I’ve seen in a while:

The Fragmented Orchestra, winners of the PRS Foundation’s New Music Award 2008, presents 24 hours of music, neuroscience and performance at 24 sites across the UK. The London events include: 10am, at the Institute of Psychiatry, in Camberwell, a prerecorded debate on Music and the Mind is transmitted to the soundbox between (10 am-midday); Then, at the National Portrait Gallery (midday-1.30pm) the violinist Rolf Wilson plays excerpts from Bach’s Partita in E and Prokofiev’s unaccompanied Violin Sonata. Plus, the playwright/neurologist Paul Broks and actors present ‘The Fragmented Self’, exploring the human brain. The Stephen Lawrence Centre (Brookmill Rd, SE8, 1pm-2pm) hosts Howard Monk of The Local in an acoustic session featuring David Thomas Broughton and others. Followed (3pm-5pm) with an exmination of having a stroke, at the Rochelle School (Arnold Circus, E2). Including, Terry Riley’s ‘In C’ one of the paradigmatic pieces of contemporary classical music, and presented by South London Arts collective What They Could Do, They Did. St Andrew’s, Fulham Fields, the Stations of the Cross are walked liturgically between 6pm and 7pm with newly commissioned music and words of reflection. (See website for full details.)

Vision for all

Inventor’s 2020 vision: to help 1bn of the world’s poorest see better:

Silver has devised a pair of glasses which rely on the principle that the fatter a lens the more powerful it becomes. Inside the device’s tough plastic lenses are two clear circular sacs filled with fluid, each of which is connected to a small syringe attached to either arm of the spectacles.

The wearer adjusts a dial on the syringe to add or reduce amount of fluid in the membrane, thus changing the power of the lens. When the wearer is happy with the strength of each lens the membrane is sealed by twisting a small screw, and the syringes removed. The principle is so simple, the team has discovered, that with very little guidance people are perfectly capable of creating glasses to their own prescription.

Such an amazing idea. With self-adjustable glasses cheap enough, and with the right distribution networks, sight could be restored to massive numbers of poor people in the world.

Someone Once Told Me

Such a cool idea for a photo project:

What SOTM actually means is that people are asked, sometimes by appointment and sometimes randomly, to hold up a large piece of paper, upon which they write something that someone once told them. Or emailed. Or texted. Basically something that’s been communicated to them. But told, preferably.

Check out Someone Once Told Me. Here’s a video of the project:

Old mixtapes and stories

I’m going to steal Ben‘s job for a minute. I can’t resist a good web-based nostalgia site, especially one that elevates analog. CASSETTE FROM MY EX takes old mixtapes, streams them, and posts the interesting stories from interesting people to go along with them:

They were into you, so they made you a tape. Today you dont have a cassette player, but you still cant toss that mix. We share the stories and the soundtrack to your earliest loves.

There are some really great stories and some interesting mixes to be heard. I love the sound of a needle scratching vinyl. This one’s going in my feeds.

Easy digital photos with vintage cameras

img_3903_thumb.jpgThis is such a cool, simple trick:

You’ll need two cameras for this trick: one (preferably digital) to take the picture and another to aim through. Most people seem to favor cameras with waist-level viewfinders, such as the old Kodak Duaflex, because they’re large and easy to see.Frame your shot using the older camera (call it Camera B), then aim your digital camera (Camera A) at the viewfinder and take the picture. Afterwards, crop the photo to take out everything but the viewfinder image.

The results look pretty awesome!