Upcoming FISA Bill Would Grant Telecoms Immunity

Slashdot | New FISA Bill Would Grant Telcoms Immunity; Vote Is Tomorrow


“This just in: a new ‘compromise’ FISA Bill PDF was just made public, which, the Electronic Frontier Foundation reports, ‘contains blanket immunity for telecoms that helped the NSA break the law and spy on millions of ordinary Americans.’ The House vote is tomorrow, June 20. After all the secret rooms and everything … if they get immunity and the public never finds out what happened, the only other logical next step is to convince everyone I know not to get an iPhone.”

It’ll be interesting to see how McCain and Obama vote. Oh, and if you believe in justice and/or freedom, it might be a good idea to pester your congressman.

Another Bush veto

bush_via_the_daily_mirror.jpgI forgot to post this one the other day:

President Bush on Saturday further cemented his legacy of fighting for strong executive powers, using his veto to shut down a Congressional effort to limit the Central Intelligence Agency’s latitude to subject terrorism suspects to harsh interrogation techniques.

Mr. Bush vetoed a bill that would have explicitly prohibited the agency from using interrogation methods like waterboarding, a technique in which restrained prisoners are threatened with drowning and that has been the subject of intense criticism at home and abroad. Many such techniques are prohibited by the military and law enforcement agencies.

Mr. Bush announced the veto in the usual format of his weekly radio address, which is distributed to stations across the country each Saturday. He unflinchingly defended an interrogation program that has prompted critics to accuse him not only of authorizing torture previously but also of refusing to ban it in the future. “Because the danger remains, we need to ensure our intelligence officials have all the tools they need to stop the terrorists,” he said.

This is not surprising, really, but important to note (related).

FISA

Ugh.

House Democrats are expected to unveil and possibly vote on their FISA bill this week. While they may (or may not) end up securing some additional, mild safeguards against eavesdropping abuses as compared to the Rockefeller/Cheney Senate bill, it is almost certain that they will ultimately end up granting amnesty to lawbreaking telecoms and gutting most of the long-standing, core protections of FISA. The recent, extraordinary revelations of just how sweeping is the administration’s spying on domestic calls and emails of Americans seem to have had little effect thus far on what appears to be the inevitable course.

House tries to ban waterboarding

And of course, Bush promises to veto:

The US House of Representatives has approved a bill that would ban the CIA from using harsh interrogation techniques such as simulated drowning.

The measure would require intelligence agencies to follow the rules adopted by the US Army, which forbid such methods, and to abide by the Geneva Conventions.

President George Bush has threatened to veto the bill if the Senate passes it.

As presidents go, Bush has been one of the most sparing in his use of the veto. So he must only use it when it really matters, when it’s vital to our nation’s interests that Congress doesn’t mess something up really bad. Let’s take a look at the list so far: Continue reading