Film fan

OK, so as it was pointed out this weekend, I’m a total photo nerd. And even though my beloved old Nikon F chewed up and spat out a roll of exposed film Saturday night, I still firmly believe in the power of film over digital. Not that I’m anti-digital, but given the choice, I’d usually shoot with an old film camera. I’m tempted to turn this into a more general argument for analog over digital, but I’ll hold back. So speaking of old cameras and film, here’s a really awesome page that  lists cameras by type and shows example images from each.

Click for original size

(Taken with my Lubitel lomo.)

Life through an SX-70 lens

This has been blogged ubiquitously today, so much so that the original site exceeded bandwidth. It should be back up soon, but until then there are still pictures around, and more background on the story here. Mental Floss says it best:

He Took a Polaroid Every Day, Until the Day He Died

Yesterday I came across a slightly mysterious website — a collection of Polaroids, one per day, from March 31, 1979 through October 25, 1997. There’s no author listed, no contact info, and no other indication as to where these came from. So, naturally, I started looking through the photos. I was stunned by what I found.

In 1979 the photos start casually, with pictures of friends, picnics, dinners, and so on.

Sadly, the story ends abruptly. But the Polaroids live on, giving their owner’s life a warm tint as only Polaroids can – a Time-Zero flipbook of a man’s daily life from 1979-1997. It’s such a powerful piece of work to me: the thousands of neatly categorized images, the inherent nostalgia of the Polaroid color palette, the mundane alongside the intimate portraits of happiness and illness, and those who lived on and honored their friend with this exhibit – the story of a life recounted by an SX-70.

Easy digital photos with vintage cameras

img_3903_thumb.jpgThis is such a cool, simple trick:

You’ll need two cameras for this trick: one (preferably digital) to take the picture and another to aim through. Most people seem to favor cameras with waist-level viewfinders, such as the old Kodak Duaflex, because they’re large and easy to see.Frame your shot using the older camera (call it Camera B), then aim your digital camera (Camera A) at the viewfinder and take the picture. Afterwards, crop the photo to take out everything but the viewfinder image.

The results look pretty awesome!

Matchbox Pinhole Camera

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I love this, and I have to make one!

Here’s my latest contraption which uses 35mm film to provide square images of 24 x 24mm. Using this size means that you can get up to 50 exposures on a standard roll of 36 exposure film. Now that’s what I call economy!The image edges suffer from distortion that gives a “Diana” quality to the pictures. In fact, the images look very “toy camera” like indeed, except that the pinhole allows some really good close ups due to the DOF of the pinhole.

It’s also costs pretty much nothing to build – certainly a lot cheaper than a $100 Diana off ebay!

The results look pretty great:

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And there’s plenty more pinhole eye-candy at his Flickr pool.